Tag Archives: wildlife

The Geyser Girl on #LisaBurtonRadio

Hey there all you woodland nymphs and water sprites. It’s Thursday, and that means it’s time for another edition of Lisa Burton Radio. The only show out there bringing you the characters from the books you love.

I’m your host, Lisa the robot girl, and my special guest today has several names. She is Flower of the Steam Basin, sometimes called the Geyser Girl. Welcome to the show, and I hope it’s okay to call you “Flower.”

“Hello, Miss Lisa. You are most gracious, and I am honored to be in your company. Please do call me Flower.”

“You’re associated with the Yellowstone Upper Geyser Basin somehow. Can you tell our listeners about that?”

“When I was an infant, the Faithful Elder, known as Old Faithful geyser, and a mother buffalo named Bearer of Song found me alone on a snowy April’s night in the geyser basin. They raised me as their own with their stories, teachings and proverbial sayings.

“To this day, my origins remain a mystery. When I was older I learned, like you, that although humanlike in form, my physiology is quite different. It enables me to visit the geysers and hot springs, even those with openings too narrow for a human to enter, and to run with the buffalo herd. I dwell with my father; for, to live in the atmosphere of a hot spring and drink of its waters is my requirement…

“I must return to the geysers, I haven’t much time…”

“I get you, girl. I’m a slave to electricity. I can go and go, but eventually have to recharge my batteries. Most of us are like that, somehow. Even the natural-born humans need to have a cup of tea, a glass of wine, a nap.”

“Yes, Miss Lisa, you understand. I grew up playing tag with the lion cubs and wolf pups while I drew up wisdom from their parents’ stories… always to return home again to the steam basin…

“When I was six, my father carried me aloft on his plume when he erupted, much as children ride their fathers’ shoulders. One day, the winds grew playful and parted the waters of the fountain, and a human child my age spotted me with her parents. In time, the family, through their discreetness, proved trustworthy, and both sets of parents allowed us to meet. Because I understand the languages of human, animal and geyser, I served as translator when my father and mother received them.

“After my mother, Bearer of Song, passed away when I was eight, it was through this loving family that I came face-to-face with a man whose storied greatness my mother related to me when I was small: him and his loyal, supportive wife. But others connected with them put me in danger… and Yellowstone…”

“Honestly, your life sounds pretty wonderful. What kind of problem could this cause?”

“My beloved mentor, Lieutenant Ned Halpen, served in the First U.S. Cavalry at Mammoth, and he journeyed throughout Yellowstone as protector of her spiritual and physical heritage. This was before the National Park Service and the rangers. Later, he took ill and lost both his legs. It was then I met him. A year later, when he died, I pledged a sacred vow to God in my father’s presence, to follow in Lt. Halpen’s footsteps and tend to all the park. It is as my mother taught me: “The mystery of your purpose will not fail to find you in its time. Follow closely in its course, this being what you will be expected to give in return.”

“The Halpens have a daughter… Eleanor, a Yellowstone ranger married to a botanist with a grant to study the plant life inside the park.

“No one told her… she found out herself… she was relentless…

“Please, dear Lisa, Eleanor and her husband have captured… and confined me in their basement laboratory for… research. They said, they cannot release an unknown life form, that I have no rights by law. Their attempts to reproduce the atmosphere and waters I need is not sufficient… I’m growing weaker, and my breath… I can barely stand…”

“Hello, we seem to have some trouble on the line. Hello, Flower, can you hear me?–”

“Why, tell me why, Robert, you insisted on keeping a telephone in the laboratory!”

“But Eleanor, who would have known…”

Known what? That this persistent aberration of nature could adapt to using a telephone? Well now, let’s learn to whom she is speaking at the other end…”

“Flower, can you hear me?”

“I can hear you perfectly, Madam. There are laws governing unknown species. And since you are acting as a friend of Miss Flower, you may well fall under that category yourself.”

“Excuse me. Who the hell are you?”

“The voice sounds robotic in nature. Remarkable how, as a composite of metal and wires, you pass yourself off as an impertinent upstart. In fact, Robert and I find the idea of your joining Miss Flower in our accommodations more than intriguing.”

“Get in line, sister. I’m involved in about a thousand lawsuits over my Copyright, Trademark, trade secrets, human trafficking, endangered species status, and the list goes on.”

“Oh, but, I don’t think we ought to wait that long. Unless you furnish your location, we will place you under arrest and strip you down to the nuts and bolts. In addition, we are prepared to have every geyser and spring bottled up in Yellowstone until your friend cooperates. Perhaps you can persuade her…”

“Again, take a number. I think what you’re doing is terrible. Flower is all about love and deserves to live freely among her loved ones.”

“I suppose you would feel that way being, yourself, a potential contamination to humans. I, for one, have had it up to here with living under my father’s shadow. Never receiving credit for my own achievements. That is about to change. Know this: my husband and I will find you wherever you try to hide yourself.”

Click

“Well, looks like we can add cuckoos to the list of species in Yellowstone. I’m worried about Flower. If you would like to find out how she fares, check out the book The Geyser Girl of Yellowstone Park, by Myrtle Brooks.

“Please remember to use those sharing buttons on your way out today. I’m sure Myrtle and Flower would do it for you, when your character appears on the next Lisa Burton Radio.

“While we’re on the topic, I’m about due for some more guests around here. If you’re planning a book release, or maybe a push of some kind, keep me in mind. This spot has grown in popularity and it might be a good stop for you.”

***’

Blurb:

In Yellowstone National Park, at the beginning of the twentieth century, a girl of mysterious origins is adopted from infancy by Old Faithful geyser, and by a mother buffalo named Bearer of Song. Beloved to all the park, Flower of the Steam Basin grows up with their stories, proverbial sayings and teachings.

In time, having met a child her own age and her parents, trust ripens between families, and Flower of the Steam Basin gains a closely protective circle of human friends. At nine years old, she is brought face-to-face with Retired Lieutenant Ned Halpen of the Yellowstone Cavalry, whose exemplary career embodied the role of protector of Yellowstone’s spiritual and physical heritage.

In the wake of Lt. Halpen’s passing one year later, her sacred vow to continue his legacy brings both reward and mortal danger. And when the circle is breached, Flower of the Steam Basin and her father are forced to choose between her own safety and well-being and the performance of her sworn duties.

This is her story, as seen through the eyes of Yellowstone.

Buy it on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, or through Myrtle Brooks.

Bio:

As written beneath her yearbook photo, Class of 1970, the expressed lifetime goal of the author herein known as Myrtle Brooks, is: “to realize the love present in everything.” Maturity has taught her that this is a vision meant to be shared. When not at home in her beloved Brooklyn, N.Y., she may be found dancing with the big rigs on the interstate as she heads for national parks and places of quiet beauty. Knowing her place, she enters such sanctuaries as a respectful visitor and humble observer; Whereupon she is lovingly greeted and made welcome as family.

Contact Myrtle at the following locations:

Facebook | Twitter | Goodreads | LinkedIn

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Just an update

It's been a crazy week here at Entertaining Stories. There were guests, and fun things all around.

Lisa Burton Radio was a big hit. I have a couple more “shows” to schedule and post, several questionnaires out, and one in the stage where I need to put the shtick together and send it back to the author. I gave the broadcast its own category so the authors could find them easily if they wanted to use them for promotion of some kind. It also gives new victims friends somewhere to see what the posts look like.

I'd like to ultimately post these about twice per month. Right now it's going to be a little more frequent to help it get off the ground.

Old What's Her Face had to get her car serviced today. I met her at the dealership and we went to breakfast. I saw rooster pheasants everywhere along my drive, and I love spotting the local wildlife.

We went to Merrit's for breakfast. This place is a Boise institution, and in fifteen years of living here, we've never been. It seems like that's pretty common. When you live somewhere, you never take in the local things. This place is an absolute dump, but it's always packed. Think unfinished concrete floors and painted over bricks with tables that might have been there for fifty years. The food was outstanding. Their signature is scones, and we each had one. There are a lot of definitions of what a scone is, but out West it's a raised dough, stretched thin and fried. They're almost always served with honey butter, and these were no exception. (My belly is pretty happy.)

When the car was finished I routed back though the farm land, but the pheasants were gone.

No idea what I will work on today. I have critiques from the guys. They liked the section, but had some useful things to say. I dropped a bunch of bombshells in the first 3000 words; think hooks. This 3000 words is a little more getting grounded in the character and story. I think it paled compared to the first submission, but it almost has to.

I also have more “Radio” things to work on. I'll probably make a new page so authors can contact me if they want a character interview. Then I have those questionnaires to follow up on.

I roughed out a micro fiction in the evenings this week. It needs some work, but fever hallucinations made a good topic. (Or were they hallucinations.)

There are still some posts to pre-write for the release of The Playground. I haven't hit that too hard, because I'm still waiting to hear from the beta readers.

The Yak Guy project always needs attention, and I'll get a chance sometime later this weekend. I'm going to loaf around with a few of the small items today, and we'll probably still have date night somewhere.

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Looking out my window

I work in downtown Boise, Idaho. I’m fortunate to have an office alongside a small stream. There is an abundance of wildlife in Boise.

Over the years, we’ve had raccoons, foxes, coyotes, and abundant wildlife. When I can, I try to snap a quick photo, but they are usually too fast for me. (particularly the foxes)

There was a mink playing in the snow outside my window last winter. I was so fascinated I never even reached for my phone. Oops. The beavers and muskrats wind up being a blip in the stream on a photo.

I have a few shots of the wood ducks and geese. The weeds are tall along the stream right now, but that will change after the first big snow. We get many blue herons and kingfishers. I have one photo of a white mallard drake that flew in with a group of the normal version. He even had the curly tail feathers to indicate his being a male.

Yesterday a big mule deer buck walked up and looked in my window at me. I slowly reached for my iPhone but he wasn’t posing. He took off, but wasn’t quite quick enough. While this isn’t the view I had originally, it’s good enough to share. Nice big antlers on him, and he looks very healthy. He cleared a six foot fence like it was nothing just outside this frame.

deer

I’m sure he’s on the search for does this time of year. I see them all the time, but he was a rare treat. I even saw a whitetail doe in the parking lot one day.

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A few more clues are in order

I figured the antler arches are famous all over North America, if not the entire world. I'll show you a couple more images in a second. First I found this in one of those touristy “rubber tomahawk” shops last night and wanted to share it.

For those of you who read Will O' the Wisp, this is proof that silver foxes really exist. This one is, unfortunately, a taxidermy display. It will suffice to prove they are real.

This is one of the most photographed mountain ranges in the world. They have also served as scenery in many movies. Usually of the John Wayne or Clint Eastwood variety.

We saw quite a bit of wildlife. The antelope and buffalo weren't very cooperative for photography. These elk, on the other hand, were willing to stop for a few seconds.

Sorry for the iPhone quality to these. This was kind of an “off the cuff” trip, and I never professed to being a photographer.

If you'd like to wager a guess, or update your guess, as to where we are, I'll tell you if you're right in the comments.

Those of you who miss my regular postings, can get a taste by reading Will O' the Wisp until I get home.

I'll update when I can…Craig.

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