A Cold Tomorrow by Mae Clair #bookreview #TuesdayBookBlog @MaeClair1

A great review of a great book. Mae is on a roll with her Point Pleasant series.

Books and Such

Where secrets make their home…

Stopping to help a motorist in trouble, Katie Lynch stumbles upon a mystery as elusive as the Mothman legend that haunts her hometown of Point Pleasant, West 30688152Virginia. Could the coded message she finds herald an extraterrestrial visitor? According to locals, it wouldn’t be the first time. And what sense should she make of her young son’s sudden spate of bizarre drawings—and his claim of a late-night visitation? Determined to uncover the truth, Katie only breaks the surface when a new threat erupts. Suddenly her long-gone ex-boyfriend is back and it’s as if he’s under someone else’s control. Not only is he half-crazed, he’s intent on murder….

As a sergeant in the sheriff’s office of the famously uncanny Point Pleasant, Officer Ryan Flynn has learned to tolerate reports of puzzling paranormal events. But single mom Katie Lynch appears to be in very real danger—and somehow…

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Productive Holiday

I headed for the writing cabin about 6:30 this morning. It was clear and cold, and apparently determined to stay that way. (Our high temperature today was a blistering nine degrees.)

Lisa* knew I was coming. (She monitors my phone and gyrocopter.) When I walked into the writing cabin, the fireplaces were pushing heat, and the coffee was hot. “What's the plan today, boss?”

“The Yak Guy. We're getting close to the end, and I want to keep making progress. Is the yak still in the basement stable?”

“Sure is.”

I turned toward the staircase, and Lisa stopped me. “Wait. Give him his carrot. I picked up a bunch, and give him one every day.”

“Won't Bunny get jealous?”

“Oh no. He gets some too.”

I grabbed the carrot by the leaves, scooped up some hot coffee, and headed downstairs.

The yak stood in his stall, but the gate was open. “Hey, brought you a carrot.”

“Thanks, but I don't care for them that much,” the yak said.

I glanced back over my shoulder. “You're going to have to eat it. Lisa thinks she's doing something wonderful for you.”

“Fine, but I've had to eat a lot of carrots in the last six months. I don't want to let out my saddle.” He accepted the carrot and started munching.

“I'm heading for the Wheel of Fortune part of the story. Is the Yak Guy ready for it?”

“He isn't too bright, but he seems to be ready when the next event comes along. All you can do is try. I don't know how he's going to react to a decision he has to make with imperfect information. He always wants to know all the answers ahead of time.”

“Don't we all. It seems more prevalent with Yak Guy's generation though. I have a hunch, he'll deal with it if I don't give him any choice.”

“You can always have me gore him in the butt again.”

“Heh, that was fun, but I don't know if we can do it again without it seeming forced.”

“I understand, but there are days I'd like to.”

“Alright, buddy, get your saddle on and I'll have Yak Guy meet you in the meadow.”

I tromped upstairs to my office and kicked Yak Guy off the couch. “Time to get to work.” He begrudgingly left, and headed outside.

Words flowed well, and the Wheel Of Fortune lesson is over. All I have to do is rescue some kids, then find some refugees, and reunite him with the love of his life. I think it's going to hit 80,000 words, and if not I'll have to enhance a couple of places. I have a hard time calling it a novel if I don't get the word count.

The yak led his human into the basement and got him all settled. Lisa asked if that was it for the day.

“I think I can manage a bit more, to be honest. I'm going to try a baseball story.”

“Oh, crap, I never called any of them.”

“No problem, this story is about a barbecue on a day when the players are off. I'm going to explore their feelings about being placed on waivers, and who their competitors are for post-season slots. We'll write it, and interview them all later to make it feel right.”

“Too bad, I would have enjoyed a barbecue and a dinner party. I have this cute little black–“

“Nevermind, let's just write it. Maybe you can put an old game on TV for some atmosphere.”

“Oh sure, no problem.”

That seemed to get Lisa focused, and I cranked out a 1000 word micro-story. I'm enjoying these tales, but I don't know how the world will receive them at large. There are a bunch of stories, and a few recurring characters. It tells the story of a mythical season, but delves behind the scenes and covers a lot of activities off the field too. In a way, it has some similarities to The Playground in the way I'm relaying it. Because there is an overarching story, I can't do the twist endings my short stories are known for. There are some, but not with the frequency an Experimental Notebook would have.

I leaned back in my chair and took a sip of my coffee. “Let's make a couple of storyboards.”

“Are you serious? I didn't thaw out the left side of your brain. I might be able to, but don't want to scorch it again.”

“Don't worry about him. We'll just pin some cards up, and we can make them perfect later on.”

Lisa headed for the basement, and returned with two storyboards, a pile of index cards, some sticky notes, and all the colored pens you could want. What can I say, the girl likes making storyboards.

We made one for a science fiction tale I'm calling Estivation. This is like hybernation, but occurs when things get too hot. It involves a cute young couple who have to spend three months in a survival bunker while a parasite sun passes by their planet. I invented the term parasite sun for a gas giant planet that manages to ignite somehow. When things line up, their own sun plus the parasite sun, makes the surface deadly.

Their bunker is already occupied by a thief, and they all get locked in together. Happiness and merriment ensue. (Not really) They don't have enough food to last three months now. Throwing the bad guy out will expose them all to deadly radiation.

Lisa put that board aside, and we made one for a project called The Hat. This involves a hard working girl, who missed out on the family decision about what to do with grandma's personal possessions. She had to pull an extra shift and missed the meeting by a couple of hours. When she gets to granny's junk shop, her evil uncle decided to sell everything. All the heronine wanted was one of grandma's house plants, but even this was denied her.

When evil uncle's back is turned, she grabs a box and takes it home. Inside the box is an old fedora hat. It wasn't even grandma's, it belonged to the grandfather she never knew. Turns out the hat talks and forms a kind of symbiotic relationship with the wearer. This one is going to become a kind of paranormal superhero type story.

When wearing the hat, my heroine can see through his eyes too. They can communicate without vocalizing their words. She can see behind her, or wherever he is looking. She can also shoot guns while using his vision, while her own vision aims a different direction. On top of that, The Hat, plays an upright bass. She needs to wear him, and he uses her fingers and hands. This part is going to be great for character purposes.

I think my main plot problem is going to involve baby snatchers, and I've decided to include an unhelpful witch in the supporting staff.

The Hat is going to be more of a buddy tale, with my heroine and the hat making up the buddies. They're going to bicker and (hopefully) grow during the tale.

Lisa said, “So The Hat can be any kind of hat she wants, as long as it's a hat? Is that what's going on?”

“Yeah, basically. She can be seen in one thing, round the corner, and it's something else completely. Maybe headphones or something. Might make a reasonable way to avoid the cops.”

“This is so exciting, I'm going to order a small mountain of hats.”

“You party on, Lisa.”

And that's where I called it a day.

*Lisa Burton is my robotic personal assistant, and the spokesmodel for Entertaining Stories.

If any of you are that interested, you can check out pin boards for The Hat, and Estivation on my Pinterest site.

 

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Weekending

We didn't take anything too seriously this weekend. We started off with gift cards from Christmas. We did the standard thing, by each spending more than was on the card. Mine went to Men's Wearhouse, and my wife's went to the Apple Store. I wound up with some nice dress shirts and ties, plus a couple of pairs of pants. It was a buy one get one free deal, so not too bad. My wife got some wireless Beats headphones. Her 'phones are awesome too.

After dumping our cards (Plus about that much more of our own money) we stopped at Old Chicago for beer and pizza. All in all, it was a nice day together.

Today, we decided not to go out at all. There are a couple of movies that look interesting, but we both weren't feeling it.

I sequestered myself away and added 1500 words to The Yak Guy Project. It's not great, but it's progress. I'm off tomorrow and have the house to myself. (Myself and Otto, who has his own demands some mornings.)

I spent several hours doing research into one of my future projects. I may start outlining both of the future projects, but won't begin writing until I get my current projects finished.

My intention was to work on The Enhanced League for a while tonight, but I never got that far. Something about a Steelers game that got a late start.

I hope you all had great weekends. I'm very content with mine. We managed a fun date – day, as opposed to date night. I made small progress on projects today, and being content seems to cover it.

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Too Much On the Plate – Guest Post by Charles E Yallowitz…

Chris The Story Reading Ape's Blog

2016 was a busy year filled. So many holidays that closed school, family events, health issues, bouts of depression, unexpected disasters, and I’m sure I’m missing other categories. Yet, somehow I managed to publish 4 books, write 5 books, write 1 short story, write 1 novella, outlining at least 10 other stories/series, and a couple hundred blog posts. This is on top of getting my son ready for school, running errands, doing laundry, cooking dinner, grocery shopping, helping my son with homework, and everything else that shows up. You might think this is a weird way to start this blog post, but I want to see if I can get you as exhausted as I am.

*Pause because I apparently have to do all the bedtime stuff alone.*

cat-meme

I’m routinely told that I should take a break, but I’m horrible at listening to this advice. So here I am as…

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Interview with SK Nichols #RRBC

S. K. Nicholls is visiting with me today to discuss her book, Naked Alliances. This book is great, and I was honored to be one of the ARC readers. Special deal for you today, it’s on sale for 99¢.

Interview with S.K. Nicholls Author of Naked Alliances

Hi, Craig. It’s freezing up here in Idaho. Park me near that fireplace in the writers cabin and ask Lisa to bring me a cup of hot cocoa. So happy to be here with you today. Oh, Otto! You’re welcome to sit in my lap, but you’re a lot heavier in real life than you look in pictures.

C.B. Please tell us about Naked Alliances, and what compelled you to write it.

S.K.: Naked Alliances is the first book in the Naked Eye Series. It’s a 74,000 word crime romp set in the seedier side of Orlando, Florida that the amusement park industry tries to hide from public view.

My husband is a crime novel aficionado. He reads three crime novels a week, and turned me onto comedy capers that tickled my funny bone. I fell in love with authors like Tim Dorsey, Carl Hiaasen, Tim Baker and Randy Wayne White. I had written a very serious historical fiction novel and needed a break, but wanted to keep writing. He challenged me to write a crime romp, a thriller with a humorous edge, and Naked Alliances was born.

C.B.: What is your book about?

S.N: In it, a lone wolf private investigator reluctantly goes undercover in a nudist resort and teams up with the unlikely custodian of a girl on the run to solve a cold case for the former mayor and bring down the mastermind of a sex trafficking ring. No possibility of encountering a concealed weapon there! With bodies piling up, Richard juggles both cases and works hard to keep his balls in the air and connect the dots before someone else dies. As his pulse-quickening quest for answers leads from the dark corners of Orlando’s Little Saigon to the sunny exposure of the Leisure Lagoon, Richard will be put to the test. Just how much will this Naked Eye have to bear…or bare?

C.B.: What themes do you explore in Naked Alliances?

S.N.: All of my writing explores social issues, from the serious to the amusing. In addition to murder, Naked Alliances looks at a crime we would all like to pretend doesn’t exist, but it is in every city and rural area in the country, sex-trafficking. As a former sexual assault nurse examiner, I witnessed, up close and personal, the extent to which our society is plagued by this crime. Honor, loyalty, the degree to which respect is owed, and justice all play a part. I took liberty with humor in the book, fielding some sexuality issues, as well.

C.B.: Why do you write?

S.N.: Because I have so much to say and nobody will listen to me talk. Writing soothes my soul.

C.B.: When do you feel the most creative?

S.N.: I have bursts of creativity. I’m not sure if that’s related to being bipolar or just the way I was made, but I get on a creative roll that will last for a few weeks, then nothing. As far as timing, I work best in the early morning and late nights.

C.B.: How picky are you with language?

S.N.: That’s a broad question. I’ve never read a crime novel that didn’t have swear words in it, unless it was a cozy. Biker dudes don’t usually ask you to please pass the salt. I’m not saying they can’t be polite, but their language, to be real, must reflect the life they live. Same is true for dialect. If a book takes place in the south, the colloquialisms and potpourri of cultures must be reflected in the writing. Naked Alliances does, so there is southern speak, patois, and with the a few characters being Puerto Rican and Vietnamese, there’s a tiny bit of Vietnamese and Spanish tossed in.

C.B.: When you write, do you sometimes feel as though you were being manipulated from afar?

S.K.: The opposite is true for me. I become my characters, and my characters become me. It’s almost like role–playing on a stage, a deeply personal experience.

C.B.: What is your worst time as a writer?

S.N.: Mid-day. I run out of steam around 2 pm and often go take a couple of hours of nap, let my head rest, get a second wind, and come back to write until 2-3 am, then take another nap.

C.B.: Your best?

S.N.: After breakfast and two cups of coffee, or after dinner and two glasses of Cab-Sav or a couple of margaritas.

C.B.: Is there anything that would stop you from writing?

S.N.: Stop me? No. But depression can slow me down. When my dad died and when we lost a young man, Gabriel, who had been living with us for a while to a dirt bike accident, I went into a writing slump. I started playing Pokemon Go to get me out of the house and into the sunshine of the gorgeous parks of Central Florida, socializing with people Gabriel’s age and those older and wiser than me.

C.B.: What’s the happiest moment you’ve lived as an author?

S.N.: Last February I had the manuscript of Naked Alliances completed and attended Sleuthfest in Boca Raton sponsored by Mystery Writers of America. We were given opportunity to read excerpts from our manuscripts. I was scared to death. Public speaking is not something I’ve done outside of my nursing career. “What if they don’t like it?” also ran through my mind.

I stood up and read my first chapter in the ten minute allotted time. We had been listening to deep, dark, gritty crime stories for an hour and mine was different. Well, the audience laughed at the funny parts, clapped, commented on what a relief it was to hear something lighter, and gave me standing ovation!

Audience and readers are everything to a writer…at least this one. Yes, the story is my baby, but when it is well received, it makes an author’s world brighter.

Sleuthfest, a writer’s convention, is open to both readers/fans and writers. In 2017, it will be held in Boca Raton, February 23-26. We would love to have you and your readers join us. It’s a fun event with keynote speakers, workshops, raffles and banquets. And the hotel serves warm chocolate chip cookies at the desk. All you have to do is ask for one.

C.B.: Is writing an obsession to you?

S.N.: Absolutely! So is Pokemon Go.

C.B.: Are the stories you create connected with you in some way?

S.N.: Always. I’m a firm believer in, “Write what you know.” That’s not to say you can’t do research on a topic that fits your writing. Research is paramount to any good story. But I believe that writing comes more naturally and readers notice when you are deeply familiar with your material.

C.B.: Ray Bradbury once said, “You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot destroy you.” Do you agree?

S.N.: My writing is reality based. Both my published books deal with real world issues. Much of my writing is prompted by reading the news or experiencing real life events. I get it, though. Writing can be an escape from the drama and trauma that is the real world.

C.B.: Do you have a website or blog where readers can find out more about you and your work?

Title: Naked Alliances

Genre: Mystery/Crime Thriller/RompNakedAlliances_JPEG

Author: S.K. Nicholls

Blog

Website: sknicholls.com

Publisher: Brave Blue Heron Books

Purchase link

Email: sknicholls@sknicholls.com

Thank you for having me here today, Craig. If Lisa has the plane de-iced, I’m ready to go home now.
If you liked Chablis in John Berendt’s Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, you will love Brandi in Naked Alliances. You can learn about Chablis here. Unfortunately, she was another celebrity lost in 2016. Readers who enjoy Florida regional writing, crime thrillers, and mysteries, books on organized crime, murder, private investigator novels, and humor will find Naked Alliances by S.K. Nicholls enjoyable.

e_dsc4834-1S.K. Nicholls is a crime romp novelistBraveBlueHeronBooks vector image that lives in Central Florida where her family has owned and operated Cypress Cove, a nudist resort, since 1964. A Registered Nurse and formerly a Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner, (S.A.N.E.) she has a special interest in sex-trafficking. Social issues are at the forefront of her writing that is always blended with humor. When she’s not writing, she can be found tracking down Snorlaxes, wandering city parks with the homeless, or sipping margaritas on the bow of a boat. She’s a member of Sisters in Crime, Florida Writers Association, Writers of Central Florida…Or Thereabouts and RRBC.

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Dabbling without a plan

I'm about three-quarters of the way through this wonderful gigantic bottle of beer. It's a Grand Teton Brewing, Double Vision Doppelbock. One of my favorite beer styles.

I spent most of my evenings dabbling with my new social media. Most but not all. Thursday was critique group. The gang is pretty happy with The Yak Guy Project thus far.

I'm ready to get the first draft finished. I have four more events that have to happen, and the story is finished. I'm loving the character arc here, and so is my critique group.

Yak Guy Ted, has to travel a bunch between these four points. This poses a problem of balancing. He's a little over 57K words, and I want it over 80K when I finish. So roughly 20K words to get to the end. Travel is an odd thing in fiction, so let's discuss it for a minute.

It takes time to ride a yak as far as Ted has to go. Too many authors have horses running full speed for days on end without food or water. This isn't realistic, and yaks are slower than horses. This means some dedication to the time involved in the process.

I can't make it completely realistic, or readers will be looking at mountains and grass for several chapters. I need to get the idea of time into the story without boring my readers. It would be a mistake to just skip to the key points without paying homage to the travel time.

I will use dialog with the yak to fill some of this in. The yak is a mentor, so there is some decent opportunity here. I will have to skip ahead, but I don't want to dwell on too many campfires and what's for dinner every night. I can probably get away with “Five days later, we rode into XXX,” about twice. After that, The events need to unfold.

My normal method is to simply write it. I'll spend more time on the events, because they are important. There will be some more action, and possibly a lesson or two along the way.

I've been known to crank out ten-thousand words in a writing session. (Once. Damn this is good beer, and I'm probably kidding myself.) In theory, I could finish in two good writing days. In reality it's going to take a couple-three weekends.

My short story project is in the same shape. I'm nearly done. The Enhanced League has passed the mid-season break, and we're headed toward the playoffs. There are several more stories to write before I get there. I have a great twist for my semi-main character planned after the season ends too. The struggle here will be to handle the playoffs without giving an inning by inning account. That would bore readers. I've already walked readers through one game, and managed to make it pretty interesting. Doing it again would be a crime. I'll probably use my sportscasters to update the playoffs, and move right into the championship. Even then, a seven game series will get old for readers. I'll have to skip ahead to the last innings of the final game. Those will be exciting. I'm happy to be this close, but probably won't get it released on MLB opening day.

Thinking about The Enhanced League, MLB opening day is April 2nd. I need to finish, beg for beta readers, order cover art, and Lisa Burton art, and it's already mid-January. I'm not rushing it. It will get done when it gets done, and so will Yak Guy.

Meanwhile, back at the social media ranch, I'm not overly impressed with Google+. It seems harder to use than Pinterest, and I don't yet see the value. I'm out there giving a +1 to posts, but only one of mine has seen the same benefit. I'm sure it takes time, but I'd love to see Lisa Burton in the top row when I search for images of her. She makes it into the fourth row right now. Tim Burton's ex wife, Lisa, is tough competition. (She didn't even take the Burton name, and I still have to compete with her.)

Pinterest is a lot more fun, and seems easier to get into. I've made multiple boards, and people seem to be finding them. I created two boards for future projects, and it's pretty handy for that. I hope these two stories will turn out to be novellas, but they'll be as long as they need to be. One of them is shaping up to be wonderfully character driven, and it's going to be a buddy story. I've even made some musical pins to go with it. After finishing Yak Guy and Enhanced League, I'll probably outline it, and the imagery makes a great reference. My Pinterest guru says more boards is important, so I'll probably start a few more.

There you have it. It's Friday night, and I don't have a weekend plan. I'll use any available writing time to add to The Yak Guy Project. My more disruptive time will probably get dedicated to Google+ and Pinterest. We'll weave in date night and some family time too. I won't deal with my critiques until later, but Monday is a holiday, and I might make a few edits.

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In a Small Compass, on Lisa Burton Radio

Welcome to another edition of Lisa Burton Radio. I'm your host, Lisa the robot girl, and with me today is author, James Ferris Wheeler. “Welcome to the show, James.”

“Thank you, Lisa. I feel very honoured to be invited by a charming celebrity like you.”

“Why, thank you. I understand that you just ordered a new suit. Can you tell our listeners why?”

“It is still hard to believe, Lisa. You must know, my previous books, well – they are good, and they sell. And I always craved for a little fame. What the readers say: 'Great books. Who wrote them? Sorry, that name slipped from my mind.' After years of writing one book after the other – my latest novel, “Dagger in the Rock” was nominated for the MFBS Award! The Most Fascinating Books Society is very fastidious and secretive about their nominations.”

“How exciting. This award sounds like a big deal. Tell our listeners something about it.”

“The award ceremony is going to be held in the Royal Hall at the famous Eden University. The TV crews are certainly already setting up their gear, proving once again that red carpet, purple drapes, and shimmering candelabras enhance this prestigious event. Evening attire is required, hence the new suit. Imagine – only the best authors receive a nomination. The respective winners receive a statuette and 100,000 GBP, and continuous news coverage.”

“Sounds like a great place for a red carpet broadcast. People in beautiful clothes entering a beautiful hall. I'll bet your wife is really excited for such a big event.”

“Angela is overjoyed! She knows how I feel after even the tiniest rejection. I tend to assume the worst, I get nervous without a reason, and Angela is there for me, she is my rock, she is my anchor. Ever since receiving the invitation – I am a nervous wreck.”

“Why would you need to keep it together? Most of the time a nomination is great publicity. Winning is awesome, but there are no losers.”

“I am an introvert. Meeting strangers gives me the creeps. It is devastating to know that my readers keep forgetting my name. Angela knows me, she knows how to lift my spirits. She is a real blessing. I have this recurring dream…We are at the award ceremony, and when it comes to my category, Georgia Cartwright opens the envelope, saying 'And the winner is…' – and I wake up before I know the winner's name. Angela keeps telling me to consider this a dress rehearsal. It helps – at least a little. I need to win – for my sanity. I don't want to be second-best for once.”

“Aww, poor baby. There are a lot of introverts in the writing business, and I work for one of the biggest ones you ever saw. You should be enjoying this moment and not dwelling on the actual award quite so much. It sounds like Angela's a keeper and you should listen to her.”

“I love Angela, my guardian angel. But you have to understand that there are a lot of great British writers out there. Some of them have been nominated for the umpteenth time! They know how to socialize, they know how to promote their work. You may now ask yourself why I can talk with you so freely. The answer is easy: The audience does not see me.”

“What if they wrote better stories? You've obviously been nominated, so your work is good too. At that level everything is subjective. Ask five different people, you'll get five different winners. So tell me about this suit. What did you order?”

“I selected a slightly shimmering slate grey one – it is accentuated by the silken bow tie Angela bought me. I have to look my best as the event is shown nation-wide.”

“Sounds very posh. What's Angela wearing?”

“Angela's wearing a charcoal grey dress with turquoise accents – she looks stunning in that dress!

“You don't understand how difficult it is being a fictional author. I thought Karen would never finish my story. Can you imagine that the kept interrupting my story due to her craving for coffee?! Did I mention that she was writing other stories in parallel? How dare she!”

“Oh, I get it. I'm a personal assistant to an author myself. We've had a guy living at the writing cabin for a year now, and his story still isn't finished. So when you talk about these other stories, it's probably a good time to mention this is a collection of short fiction.”

“Yes. There are 15 contemporary short fiction stories with paranormal streaks taking the readers to Boston, Dublin, Dundrum, Galway, Heidelberg, London, Munich, Nuremberg, Skerries, and other places. London, that's my story! The other stories introduce quit normal people and some strange occurrences:

– Rachel has a recurring nightmare. > poor woman!

– Madelyn and her marble. > has the poor girl lost her marbles?

– Jenny and the shadow. > why doesn't she switch the light on?

– Louise and her hunches. > has she visited the lady with the crystal ball?

– Ted and the noises. > try earwax, man!

– Dee and her prison. > poor woman – let her out!

– The heatwave in Willowsend. > a fictional town and a grandfather.

– Judy and her projections. > why don't you join a circus, girl?

– Joe and a voice. > hey Joe, keep cool.

– Roberta and Laura. > a multi-cultural encounter.

– Marty giving directions. > hey boy, it's great that you care.

– James Ferris Wheeler and the award. > my story – I'm so excited!

– Aoife at the Dundrum Town Centre. > hey lass – you're funny!

-The secret of the blue window – with two alternative endings.

These story variants are based on human curiosity. If I had seen that blue window – I would've wanted to find out why it is blue!”

“We love collections and anthologies around here too. They're getting really popular and I think you're going to be pretty successful. The anthology is called In a Small Compass: Volume One, and it's available right now. Pick up a copy for free and find out if James wins the MFBS award. I'll include all the details on the blog site. Any closing words, James?”

“Thank you so much for having me on your show, Lisa. It means a lot! And it helped in keeping my frustrating dream at bay. Have a lovely day.”

“Best of luck to James, and his lovely wife Angela. For Lisa Burton Radio, I'm Lisa Burton.

“Don't forget to hit those sharing buttons on your way out. It won't cost you a dime, and when your character is on the show you'll really appreciate it.”

***

In A Small Compass

15 contemporary short fiction stories with paranormal streaks take you on a journey to Boston, Dublin, Dundrum, Galway, Heidelberg, London, Munich, Nuremberg, Skerries, and other places.

Find out more about:

– Rachel and her nightmare.

– Madelyn and her marble.

– Jenny and the shadow.

– Louise and her hunches.

– Ted and the noises.

– Dee and her prison.

– The heatwave in Willowsend.

– Judy and her projections.

– Joe and a voice.

– Roberta and Laura.

– Marty giving directions.

– James Ferris Wheeler and the award.

– Aoife at the Dundrum Town Centre.

– The secret of the blue window – with two alternative endings.

Karen was born in Central Europe, discovering her love for languages at an early age. She is a linguist, translator, and technical author; writing is done in her spare time. She spends her time mainly in Germany and Ireland, collecting her inspirations on the go.

Her stories comprise some hobbies, favourite locations, animals, topics, beverages, etc. Most of the locations do exist; pubs and/or shops might be gone; people are fictional unless stated otherwise.

+++ Upcoming: “Neighbors!” (a flash fiction series) +++

Karen's personal motto:

Don’t look back in anger!

Karen's 10 statements

A typical work day begins with… black coffee and my schedule.

I lose track of time… when I am reading.

I have always… wanted to live in Ireland.

I have never… been bored.

Home means to me… being with the ones I love.

I am inspired by… almost everything.

I would like to meet… (and discuss with) the Dalai Lama.

My worst character trait… impatience.

My best character trait… open-mindedness.

The best advice I was given… keep an open mind.

***

Blog: https://mytrainofthoughtson.wordpress.com/

Blog: https://inasmallcompass.wordpress.com/

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/okiewashere

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16149973.Karen_Oberlaender

AuthorsDB: http://authorsdb.com/community/profile/6832-karen-oberlaender

Buy/download links: http://books2read.com/u/m0zodW

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