Tag Archives: leftovers

Better the second day

Everyone in my family loves Chinese food… except for me. It’s food, it’s okay, but I always just kind of went with the flow until a few years ago.

That’s when we bought our bibimbap bowls. These are carved from a solid piece of soapstone. Soapstone is wonderful, because it absorbs a temperature and hangs on to it. I have a huge slab I’ve even frozen before and used as a serving board for shrimp cocktail.

Last night our date night was to P. F. Changs. We made sure to order extra in anticipation of tonight. It really doesn’t matter what dishes you order, they all get the same treatment.

First stick your stone bowls into the oven and bring them up to 500 degrees. Think of them like a battery, they’re going to take on heat and hold it for hours. (Dinner won’t take hours, but it forces me to wait before washing them up.)

Add a generous splash of sesame oil to the bottom of your bowl. The first layer is leftover rice. Any kind works, but I recommend leftover fried rice. The kind they add everything but the kitchen sink to.

I like to stir mine around to get a good sizzle going. We shared the fried rice leftovers, and added a bit more of the white rice that nobody ever seems to eat with dinner.

Then we passed around the takeout cartons. Anything left is fair game here. Hopefully, there is a bit of some protein left, but it isn’t completely necessary.

Crack an egg, and place it raw over the top. Add a generous scoop of Asian chili paste, then put the lid back on. Old What’s Her Face saved me a spoonful of broth from her won ton soup. Makes a nice steam for my egg.

Give it a minute or so.

In my case, I like to place everything nice and neat, but that ends at suppertime. When you’re ready, place the lid aside, break the egg, and stir it all up. Add soy if you like.

This time we had noodles, sweet and sour, some choice beef bits. Other times there has been broccoli, shrimp, pork, it honestly doesn’t matter.

This is Chinese food I love. I’m sure it works with Japanese or Korean food too, but I haven’t gone that far. A few gyosa, maybe a couple of those tiny pork ribs, I’m sure it’s all great.

The bell peppers and chunks of onion will get lava hot, so blow on them.

Ahhhh!

Maybe I’ll clean up the bowls in a couple of hours after they cool.

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Just give that last Macabre Macaroni to the dog

I had one story left. It didn’t seem to completely fit the Halloween idea.

I felt inspired by NASA’s abandoned space gun project, and the new Navy rail gun.

Message in a Bottle

“Commander Allen, this is Houston. We’re going to need you to switch to a secure network before describing that debris.”

“Roger, Houston. Switching now…Houston, Commander Allen here. How are you reading me?”

“Loud and clear, Commander. Now what did you say it was made of?”

“Houston, it appears to be made from some kind of brass, or bronze. It’s about the size and shape of a watermelon with Fins, it has an antenna out the aft end.”

“Is it still transmitting?”

“Affirmative, Houston. Just a single ping about every ten minutes or so, like someone wanted us to find it. There’s a door in the side and I’m going to open it.”

“Make sure you can jettison it if something goes wrong.”

“Roger that, Houston. I’m still in the cargo bay and the doors are open. I’m turning the screws loose right now.”

“Try to get us a visual, Commander. We suspect it might be Korean. We want pictures in case you have to deep six it.”

“Suit cameras coming on now. It appears to be a piece of paper inside- No wait, it’s a big leaf, but it’s not like any leaf I’ve ever seen before. Kind of like leather.”

“Roger that. What are those marks on it?”

“It says, Hamburg, 1943.

“We listened to the Allied bombers every day and night, praying they would get closer. We needed cover to fire the space mortar and the bombings were as good as we were going to get.

“We’d been hunted by the Nazis for over five years. Getting caught meant certain death. Leaving was nearly certain death. We elected to take the small chance we had left and risked our very lives on a narrow escape. We didn’t know what we would find and doubted our supplies would last.

“We are alive and well at the time of this message. This tiny vessel is made from the last working parts of our ship. We are marooned, but happily so. The soil here is good for farming and we have domesticated some of the local fauna.

“There is life among the stars, if you know where to look. Come in peace or don’t come at all. Signed Ernst Cohen.”

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